Today's archidose #1012

23 hours 26 minutes ago
Here are some more photos from my recent summer road trip: the new Museum at Gateway Arch (2018) in St. Louis, Missouri, by James Carpenter Design Associates and Cooper Robertson with Trivers Associates; landscaping by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates.

Gateway Arch Visitor Center
Gateway Arch Visitor Center
Gateway Arch Visitor Center
Gateway Arch Visitor Center
Gateway Arch Visitor Center
Gateway Arch Visitor Center
Gateway Arch Visitor Center
Gateway Arch Visitor Center

To contribute your Flickr images for consideration, just:
:: Join and add photos to the archidose poolTo contribute your Instagram images for consideration, just:
:: Tag your photos #archidose
ArchiWeb

Cloud Tower / tnE Architects

1 day 17 hours ago
© Lukas Schaller © Lukas Schaller
  • Architects: tnE Architects
  • Location: Grafenegg 10, 3485 Grafenegg, Austria
  • Lead Architects: tnE Architects ZT GmbH – harnoncourt | fuchs & partner
  • Area: 651.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2007
  • Photographs: Lukas Schaller, Alexander Haiden
  • Overall Planning: ARGE tnE Architects | Land in Sicht
  • Landscape Planning: Land in Sicht, Vienna, A; Thomas Proksch
  • Structural Engineering: Ingenieurteam GmbH Bergmeister, Varna-Vahrn, I; Josef Taferner, Jochen Ehmann
  • Acoustics: Müller-BBM GmbH, Munich, D; Prof. Karlheinz Müller
  • Light Design: Christian Ploderer, Vienna, A
  • Light Planning: Wiltschko Lichtplanung, Berndorf, A
  • Calculation: sglw architekten, Wien; Werner Silbermayr
  • Reinforced Concrete Materials Consulting: Ingenieurbüro Prof. Schießl, Munich, D; Christian Sodeikat
  • Project Management: NÖ Hypo Bauplanungs- und Bauträgergesellschaft m.b.H., St. Pölten, A; Johannes Reiterlehner
  • Controlling: Azberger-Höss ZT GmbH, St. Pölten, A
  • Construction Supervision: BM Horst Pratter, Judendorf-Straßengel, A
  • Supervision Landscaping: Land in Sicht, Vienna, A; Andreas Beneš
  • Building Related Physics: Wolfgang Hebenstreit, Vienna, A
  • Geological Survey: Mario J. Potoschnik, Vienna
  • Site Survey: Gerhard Senftner, St. Pölten, A
  • Hvac Planning: Christian Koppensteiner, Vienna, A
  • General Contractor: Alpine Mayreder Bau GmbH, Horn, A
  • Structural Steel: Pagitz Metalltechnik GmbH, Vienna, A
  • Prefabricated Concrete: Alfred Trepka GmbH, Ober-Grafendorf, A
  • Drywall: Perchtold Trockenbau GesmbH, Wiener Neudorf, A
  • Metal Works: Heinrich Renner Ges.m.b.H., Langenlois, A
  • Carpenter: Pöchlhacker Holzbau GmbH, Ybbs, A
  • Glazing: Rigo-Glas GmbH, Wien
  • Painter: Farben Traht, Etsdorf am Kamp, A
  • Electrical Installation & Equipment: Eichinger&Stuber, Langenlois, A
  • Plumbing Equipment & Installation: Caliqua Gebäudetechnik GmbH, Wiener Neudorf, A
  • Landscape Gardening: Kanovsky Gmbh, Klagenfurt, A
© Lukas Schaller © Lukas Schaller

Text description provided by the architects. In May 2005 the next ENTERprise and the landscape architects Land in Sicht won the competition for a contemporary restructuring of the historical park and for an open-air pavilion. The pavilion was conceived as a landmark, as an attractor to the park but also as an outstanding performance space for classical music during festival season in summer.

© Lukas Schaller © Lukas Schaller

Conceptually the pavilion is based on the idea of a figure that is not bound by any particular purpose and is perceived as a stage only during performances. How can such a free structure serve as an acoustical instrument, able to focus sound energy and direct it to 1700 seats for an ideal music experience?

© Lukas Schaller © Lukas Schaller

As a spatial figure the pavilion is generated from elements of the landscape – the depression, the slope, the incision, the hillock – and the architectural folding of the roof.

Situation plan Situation plan

The 'Schneise' (loosely translated: an incision in the landscape) creates a vista linking the riding school to the 'Black Gate’ and serves as an entrance to and a passage through the auditorium area. The staging of views and spatial sequences, the framing and hiding of points of attraction, often achieved by the meandering layout of paths in the traditional landscape garden, is a theme taken up by varying the elevation of the incision to achieve these effects.

© Alexander Haiden © Alexander Haiden

Coming from the main entrance, the visitor is enticed to proceed by the silhouette of the stage roof, visible behind an artificial mound. Immersing himself into the incision, he tunnels through the hill and – after passing this deep and narrow space – enters the wide arena of the auditorium and the stage, the stage roof suspended above it.

Plan Plan

The pavilion is inserted into the existing relational field of entrance gate, riding school, castle, 'Black Gate' and the 'Große Senke' (lit. transl.: large depression) and in the process re-contextualizes the network of views in the landscape. Through its topographical configuration it reinterprets formal elements of the landscape garden – the play with perspective and visual relations, with contraction and expansion, with enclosure and opening. 

Section AA / Section CC Section AA / Section CC

The basic rule of acoustics for open-air stages, 'what you see is what you hear' serves as a cue to explore affinities between perspective and acoustic space. The topography of the existing depression – the 'Große Senke' – was emphasized by modeling the terrain. Artificial hillocks are created by further excavating the depression and subsequently redistributing the soil at its perimeter, thus creating the auditorium tiers. Clearly distinguished from the natural terrain by their geometry, stage and auditorium nonetheless merge fluidly with the topography of the site.

© Lukas Schaller © Lukas Schaller

Conceptually, materials were chosen to underscore the open-air character of the site and to strengthen the bond between built structure and landscape. The stage is a monolithic structure of fair-faced concrete, steel and glass embedded into an enveloping hillock. The audience tiers were designed using prefabricated concrete elements, compacted gravel surfaces and lawn-covered, geometrically precise hillocks.

Section BB Section BB

The stage roof is designed as an autonomous, sculptured object. Suspended above the landscape on a level with the tree canopies it is placed among the groups of trees as if it were one more of them. The shiny metal surface on the outside reflects the sky and the trees, turning the roof into a cloud-tower.

ArchiWeb

A Step by step Guide to the Home Building process

4 days 9 hours ago

The idea of building your own home has become increasing popular. This has been partly fuelled by the high price of existing property and partly as a result of the desire to build something unique and environmentally friendly.

Once you’ve decided that you want to build your own home then you need to familiarize yourself with the process.

Prep

The first step is locating the land that you wish to build on. It will need to have planning permission or you’ll need to be prepared to apply for it.

Before you apply it is important to be aware of the local planning rules and have a blueprint of your intended build drawn up. You’ll find it useful to enlist the help of an architect at this stage.

Of course you can choose to buy a home off plan but this may not give you the uniqueness you desire.

Finance

If you have enough capital to build your own property then that’s fantastic. All you have to do is create your budget and make sure you stay within it. Having said that it is a good idea to have a little in reserve; there are always good reasons why a project has gone over budget.

But, if you don’t have enough capital to finish the project you’ll need to consider getting construction finance. You’ll be expected to put down a 20% deposit and the funds will be released in stages. This keeps the risk at a minimum for both parties.

Get Staff

You have a choice, you can entrust the entire project to a builder or you can click here to find the best available trades people in your area.  This s a great option to keep your budget down and if you want to do some of the building yourself.

You can simply hire the people you need as and when you need them. They will take care of all the specialist parts of the building process while you concentrate on the construction.

Choose Materials

You can do this before the build or during but be aware that any material which is hard to get hold of could slow down your build.

While it is traditional to build with wood or brick you may prefer a more environmentally friendly route. Equally if this is your choice it may be necessary to confirm it’s acceptable with planning first.

Finishing Off

It’s your job to complete any section of the build you can and to supervise the trades people you have employed. You need to make sure they are all working on the time scales you have given and that they are performing all the right details of the job.

Ideally every trades person should know exactly what job they are being asked to do and how long they have to do it.

This will help to keep your build on time and in budget.

Once the shell is built you’ll have to start looking at the internal furnishings. This is when personal taste comes into play and you can easily blow the remainder of your budget without finishing the build; choose wisely.

Don’t forget you’ll need to have our property inspected and certified when it’s finished.

ArchiWeb

Hospitals and Health Centers: 50 Floor Plan Examples

4 days 13 hours ago
Cortesía de Fabian Dejtiar Cortesía de Fabian Dejtiar

A floor plan is an interesting way to represent and approach the functional program of hospitals and health centers, where the complexity of the system implies the need for specific studies of the distribution and spatial organization for proper health care.

From our published projects, we have found numerous solutions and possibilities for health centers and hospitals depending on the site's specific needs.

Below, we have selected 50 on-site floor plan examples that can help you better understand how architects design hospitals and health care centers.

Maggie's Cancer Centre Manchester / Foster + Partners

Cortesía de Foster + Partners Cortesía de Foster + Partners

 

Hospital Complex Broussais / a+ samueldelmas

via a+ samueldelmas via a+ samueldelmas

Livsrum - Cancer Counseling Center / EFFEKT

via EFFEKT via EFFEKT

Villa el Libertador Príncipe de Asturias Municipal Hospital / Santiago Viale + Ian Dutari + Alejandro Paz

via Santiago Viale + Ian Dutari + Alejandro Paz via Santiago Viale + Ian Dutari + Alejandro Paz

Municipal Healthcare Centres San Blas + Usera + Villaverde / Estudio Entresitio

via Estudio Entresitio via Estudio Entresitio

San Jerónimo Hospital Refurbishment / SV60 Arquitectos

via SV60 Arquitectos via SV60 Arquitectos

Villeneuve-Saint-Georges Hospital / Atelier d’architecture Michel Rémon

via Atelier d’architecture Michel Rémon via Atelier d’architecture Michel Rémon

Psychopedagogical Medical Center / Comas-Pont arquitectos

via Comas-Pont arquitectos via Comas-Pont arquitectos

D’olot i Comarcal Hospital / Ramon Sanabria + Francesc Sandalinas

via Ramon Sanabria + Francesc Sandalinas via Ramon Sanabria + Francesc Sandalinas

Sant Joan de Reus University Hospital / Pich-Aguilera Architects + Corea & Moran Arquitectura

via Pich-Aguilera Architects + Corea & Moran Arquitectura via Pich-Aguilera Architects + Corea & Moran Arquitectura

Angdong Hospital Project / Rural Urban Framework

via Rural Urban Framework via Rural Urban Framework

Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau / Silvia Barbera Correia + Jose luis Canosa + Francisco Rius + Esteban Bonell + Josep Maria Gil

via Silvia Barbera Correia + Jose luis Canosa + Francisco Rius + Esteban Bonell + Josep Maria Gil via Silvia Barbera Correia + Jose luis Canosa + Francisco Rius + Esteban Bonell + Josep Maria Gil

Dronning Ingrids Hospital / C. F. Møller Architects

via C. F. Møller Architects via C. F. Møller Architects

Cerdanya Hospital / Brullet Pineda Arquitectes

via Brullet Pineda Arquitectes via Brullet Pineda Arquitectes

El Carmen Hospital Maipu / BBATS Consulting & Projects + Murtinho+Raby Arquitectos

via BBATS Consulting&Projects SLP + Murtinho+Raby Arquitectos via BBATS Consulting&Projects SLP + Murtinho+Raby Arquitectos

Hospital Tierra De Barros / EACSN + Junquera Arquitectos

via EACSN + Junquera Arquitectos via EACSN + Junquera Arquitectos

Nuevo Hospital Universitario La Fe de Valencia / Ramon Esteve, Alfonso Casares

via Ramon Esteve, Alfonso Casares via Ramon Esteve, Alfonso Casares

Kangbuk Samsung Hospital / Hyunjoon Yoo Architects

via Hyunjoon Yoo Architects via Hyunjoon Yoo Architects

Hospital Campus de la Salud / PLANHO + AIDHOS arquitectos S.A.

via PLANHO + AIDHOS arquitectos S.A. via PLANHO + AIDHOS arquitectos S.A.

Hospital of Sant Joan Despi Doctor Moises Broggi / Pinearq + Brullet-De Luna Arquitectes

via Brullet-De Luna Arquitectes + PINEARQ via Brullet-De Luna Arquitectes + PINEARQ

Nemours Children’s Hospital / Stanley Beaman & Sears

via Stanley Beaman & Sears via Stanley Beaman & Sears

Vall d’Hebron Hospital / Estudi PSP Arquitectura

via Estudi PSP Arquitectura via Estudi PSP Arquitectura

Hospital of Mollet / Corea Moran Arquitectura

via Corea Moran Arquitectura via Corea Moran Arquitectura

Hospital General de la Línea de la Concepción / Planho Consultores

via Planho Consultores via Planho Consultores

Subacute Hospital of Mollet / Mario Corea Arquitectura

via Mario Corea Arquitectura via Mario Corea Arquitectura

Hisham A. Alsager Cardiological Hospital / AGi Architects

via AGi Architects via AGi Architects

New Lady Cilento Children's Hospital / Lyons + Conrad Gargett

via Lyons + Conrad Gargett via Lyons + Conrad Gargett

The Christ Hospital Joint and Spine Center / SOM

© SOM © SOM

Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá / El Equipo de Mazzanti

via El Equipo de Mazzanti via El Equipo de Mazzanti

Hospital General de Níger / CADI

via CADI via CADI

Nelson Mandela Children's Hospital / Sheppard Robson + John Cooper Architecture + GAPP + Ruben

via Sheppard Robson + John Cooper Architecture + GAPP + Ruben via Sheppard Robson + John Cooper Architecture + GAPP + Ruben

NGS Macmillan Unit / The Manser Practice

via The Manser Practice via The Manser Practice

Rocio's Hospital / Manoel Coelho Arquitetura e Design

via Manoel Coelho Arquitetura e Design via Manoel Coelho Arquitetura e Design

Healthcare Center in Valenzá / IDOM

via IDOM via IDOM

Urban Hospice / NORD Architects

via NORD Architects via NORD Architects

Legacy ER Allen / 5G Studio Collaborative

via 5G Studio Collaborative via 5G Studio Collaborative

Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center / SmithGroup

via SmithGroupJJR via SmithGroupJJR

Kraemer Radiation Oncology Center / Yazdani Studio of CannonDesign

via Yazdani Studio of CannonDesign via Yazdani Studio of CannonDesign

Nozay Health Center / a+ samueldelmas

via a+ samueldelmas via a+ samueldelmas

Health Municipal Clinic / studiolada architects

via studiolada architects via studiolada architects

Bridgepoint Active Healthcare / Stantec Architecture + KPMB Architects + HDR Architecture + Diamond Schmitt Architects

via Stantec Architecture + KPMB Architects + HDR Architecture + Diamond Schmitt Architects via Stantec Architecture + KPMB Architects + HDR Architecture + Diamond Schmitt Architects

Asahicho Clinic / hkl studio

via hkl studio via hkl studio

Health Clinic Ruukki / alt Architects + Karsikas

via alt Architects + Karsikas via alt Architects + Karsikas

Medical Centre Cortes / Iñigo Esparza Arquitecto

via Iñigo Esparza Arquitecto via Iñigo Esparza Arquitecto

Healthcare Center in Tordera / Carles Muro + Charmaine Lay

via Carles Muro + Charmaine Lay via Carles Muro + Charmaine Lay

Primary Care Center / Josep Camps & Olga Felip

via Josep Camps & Olga Felip via Josep Camps & Olga Felip

Urban Day Care Center for Alzheimer Patients / Cid + Santos

via Cid + Santos via Cid + Santos

Health Center in Oleiros / Abalo Alonso Arquitectos

via abalo alonso arquitectos via abalo alonso arquitectos

A Parda Health Centre / Vier Arquitectos

via Vier Arquitectos via Vier Arquitectos

Centro de Salud de Quintanar del Rey / MBVB ARQUITECTOS

via MBVB ARQUITECTOS via MBVB ARQUITECTOS
ArchiWeb

Yo-Yo Pedestrian Zones: What Makes Urban Walkability Flourish or Fail?

6 days 2 hours ago
[ By SA Rogers in Architecture & Cities & Urbanism. ]

A bustling car-filled street by day and a 1,500-foot pedestrian promenade on weekend nights, Sai Yeung Choi Street South in the dense neighborhood of Mong Kok was the stage upon which urban life in Hong Kong played out – markets, music, dancing, protests, parties. Clashes with police. Noise. So much noise, in fact, that after 1,200 complaints in a single year, the district council decided to end the street’s 18-year run as a part time pedestrian zone and reopen it to vehicular traffic 24/7. What will this mean for a city where public transit accounts for 90 percent of daily passenger trips, yet infrastructure revolves around cars?

Mong Kok

Mong Kok

Some Hong Kong residents see the Mong Kok street’s closure as emblematic of the cultural battle between everyday transit-riding urbanites who embrace city life and everything that comes along with it (including noise) and ‘elites’ who flood cities from elsewhere and expect to change how they operate to better fit their own needs. This might sound familiar to, say, San Franciscans. Walkability is a crucial quality-of-life factor for many city dwellers, but it remains in tension with both car culture and a general lack of affordability. So why do some major pedestrian zones in big cities flourish while others fail?

A History of Mixed Success

The pedestrian mall as we know it today was born in the German city of Kassel soon after the end of World War II. British bombers had leveled 80 percent of the city. City planners tasked with rebuilding decided it was the perfect opportunity to re-orient the old town’s streets to create a direct connection from the center square to the main railway station and create a distinct shopping district where pedestrians could stroll along the streets without worrying about cars.

The fountain-filled square, called Treppenstrasse, was soon copied by other German cities, and the idea spread throughout Europe. Meanwhile, in America, the first pedestrian mall opened in 1959 in Kalamazoo, Michigan and multiplied in a similar fashion, all in the hope of reviving depressed downtown areas.

What these pedestrian zones were essentially trying to recapture – in a shiny new package befitting the 1950s – was the charm of meandering medieval streets no more than a few meters wide. Crucially, these often cobblestoned streets were built at a human scale, designed to accommodate people strolling along with carts and horses rather than rows of parked vehicles and 48-foot-long semi trucks. That’s rarely the case now, especially when attempting to retrofit spaces built for cars into pedestrian-friendly areas that attract a lot of foot traffic and, ultimately, spending.

There was one major problem with ‘50s pedestrian malls right off the bat. At the time, few people lived downtown. As soon as workers went home for the day, the promenades were abandoned. It would be decades before populations began to shift toward urban centers en masse, and in the meantime, the pedestrian mall experiment was declared a failure. Fewer than 15 percent of the malls that opened during that era remain in place today.

This process of pedestrianizing certain blocks and then reopening them to traffic continued throughout the 1970s, ‘80s and ’90s, by which time shoppers were demanding plenty of free parking and covered spaces. Walking outdoors to shop and dine was old fashioned; the suburban mall reigned supreme.

Lunchtime on K Street

Chicago’s State Street pedestrian mall closed after 17 years in 1996 due to a drop in commercial activity. In Buffalo, New York, there weren’t enough people spending time downtown to support its pedestrian zone. In Sacramento, K Street went from a vibrant destination to a wasteland to a bustling pedestrian zone and back to a wasteland before the city ripped out the pedestrian-friendly infrastructure and reopened it to traffic in 2011 – only for locals to call for reversing the decision yet again, just five years later.

But what about the ones that work? New York City temporarily closed a 2.5 acre-section of Times Square to vehicular traffic for safety reasons, but it became so popular with pedestrians, the city made it a permanent feature and even had the architecture firm Snøhetta redesign it. Denver’s 16th street mall is thriving, as is Miami’s Lincoln Road Mall. Smaller college towns like Charlottesville, Iowa City and Madison have maintained popular pedestrian zones as crucial parts of their identities. In Europe, the cities of London, Paris, Oslo, Madrid, Milan, Dublin and Stockholm all have plans to create or expand significant car-free areas.

Walkability Requires Careful Planning – And Greater Equality

From all these failures and successes, it seems like the keys to making cities more walkable long-term are tailoring the scale and design of pedestrian zones to the setting, expecting roughly 15-year cycles of changing trends, accommodating businesses with features like early morning loading zones, figuring out where all the vehicular traffic will go instead to avoid worsening congestion and standing firm in commitment to reducing car usage in the area. That last point might just be the hardest one to tackle.

Some shoppers would rather give up on trying to access downtown areas due to a lack of parking than ride the bus instead, and as long as city planners continue to build massive parking garages, urban streets will remain snarled. Pedestrian zones must be integrated with public transit, taking the pressure off the streets and allowing equitable access. By many accounts, we’re moving toward an era in which car sharing will vastly reduce the number of vehicles on the roads, so we might as well begin planning for it now.

Sixth Street

Closing certain blocks to vehicular traffic part-time, like Austin’s Sixth Street, could be a convenient workaround for many cities, or at least a way to test the waters. But that brings us back to Mong Kok, which could set a precedent for the closure of Hong Kong’s other pedestrian zones due to noise complaints amidst worsening air quality from automobile emissions. Licensing systems for vendors and performers could help, but the greater problem remains the fact that Hong Kong has begun to prioritize the needs of drivers over those of the vast majority of the population.

If we want thriving cities where people actually want to congregate, walk around and spend money, we have to preserve their historic character, cultural traditions and mix of income levels. That means addressing inequality directly and limiting the influence of wealthy residents who try to sweep evidence of that inequality under the rug, like homelessness in San Francisco.

Beneath the revival of big cities around the world is a deep economic rift that makes it hard for service workers, teachers, nurses and firefighters to live in the cities where they work, let alone shop. The urban tides might pull the affluent back out into the suburbs before long, anyway, so our cities should be designed to thrive with or without them.

Top image: Times Square pedestrian redesign by Snøhetta

Share on Facebook

[ By SA Rogers in Architecture & Cities & Urbanism. ]

[ WebUrbanist | Archives | Galleries | Privacy | TOS ]


ArchiWeb
Checked
36 minutes 10 seconds ago
ARCHITECT AFRICA NEWS NETWORK : ArchiWEb 3.0 Journal
Subscribe to ArchiWEB 3.0 - Syndicated Architecture Journal feed